Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

The Baseball Hall of Fame team took the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge on Thursday, Aug. 28th, 2014. Bassett Medical Center, you’ve been nominated. Watch more Baseball Hall of Fame videos: http://ift.tt/18bou9N Visit the official Baseball Hall of Fame website: http://ift.tt/TRV4Z2 Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Twitter: http://ift.tt/18bou9S Like the Baseball Hall of Fame on Facebook: http://ift.tt/15XLM9l Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Google+: http://ift.tt/18bou9U The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is home to the greatest stars and the history of the game. Located in scenic Cooperstown, New York, the Hall of Fame is dedicated to preserving the sport’s history, honoring excellence within the game, and connecting generations through baseball.

The Hall of Fame team took the #ALSIceBucketChallenge today!

The Hall of Fame team took the #ALSIceBucketChallenge today!

The Baseball Hall of Fame team took the #ALSIceBucketChallenge on Thursday, Aug. 28th. Bassett Medical Center, you’ve been nominated.

Forty-four years ago today, Joe Torre powered the #Cardinals to a 1-0 win with a ninth-inning homer against the Dodgers. #throwbackthursday

Forty-four years ago today, Joe Torre powered the #Cardinals to a 1-0 win with a ninth-inning homer against the Dodgers. #throwbackthursday

A fierce competitor renowned for his baseball smarts, Joe Morgan could single-handedly beat opposing teams with his multifaceted skills. A two-time National League MVP in 1975 and ‘76, he was a terror on the basepaths, topping the 40-steal plateau nine times during his career. His skilled batting eye enabled him to lead the National League in on-base percentage and walks four times each. Morgan also packed considerable power into his compact frame, hitting 449 doubles and 268 home runs. Watch more Baseball Hall of Fame videos: http://ift.tt/18bou9N Visit the official Baseball Hall of Fame website: http://ift.tt/TRV4Z2 Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Twitter: http://ift.tt/18bou9S Like the Baseball Hall of Fame on Facebook: http://ift.tt/15XLM9l Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Google+: http://ift.tt/18bou9U The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is home to the greatest stars and the history of the game. Located in scenic Cooperstown, New York, the Hall of Fame is dedicated to preserving the sport’s history, honoring excellence within the game, and connecting generations through baseball.

Jim Palmer was the high-kicking, smooth-throwing hurler of Baltimore’s six championship teams of the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s. His impressive numbers include 268 victories, a .638 winning percentage, eight 20-win seasons and a 2.86 ERA over 19 seasons. He also pitched his entire career without allowing a grand slam. Intensity was the trademark of this three-time Cy Young Award winner, who combined intelligence, strength, competitiveness and consistency to become the Orioles’ all-time winningest pitcher. Watch more Baseball Hall of Fame videos: http://ift.tt/18bou9N Visit the official Baseball Hall of Fame website: http://ift.tt/TRV4Z2 Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Twitter: http://ift.tt/18bou9S Like the Baseball Hall of Fame on Facebook: http://ift.tt/15XLM9l Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Google+: http://ift.tt/18bou9U The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is home to the greatest stars and the history of the game. Located in scenic Cooperstown, New York, the Hall of Fame is dedicated to preserving the sport’s history, honoring excellence within the game, and connecting generations through baseball.

Just Arrived: Curtis Granderson’s #Mets jersey from July 27 featuring the #HOF 75th Anniversary patch.

Just Arrived: Curtis Granderson’s #Mets jersey from July 27 featuring the #HOF 75th Anniversary patch.

Enjoy highlights from the 2014 Baseball Hall of Fame Induction weekend held over the last weekend in July at Cooperstown, New York. Watch more Baseball Hall of Fame videos: http://ift.tt/18bou9N Visit the official Baseball Hall of Fame website: http://ift.tt/TRV4Z2 Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Twitter: http://ift.tt/18bou9S Like the Baseball Hall of Fame on Facebook: http://ift.tt/15XLM9l Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Google+: http://ift.tt/18bou9U The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is home to the greatest stars and the history of the game. Located in scenic Cooperstown, New York, the Hall of Fame is dedicated to preserving the sport’s history, honoring excellence within the game, and connecting generations through baseball.

32 years ago today, Rollie Fingers of the #Brewers became the first pitcher to reach the 300-save mark. #throwbackthursday

32 years ago today, Rollie Fingers of the #Brewers became the first pitcher to reach the 300-save mark. #throwbackthursday

A Day at the Ball Game

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During the summer of 1936, the Marx Brothers, along with a caravan of four writers, six musicians, eight actors, 18 chorus girls and boys, and one very talented horse, traveled the country, staging an ever-changing play full of gags, wisecracks and general hilarity. The idea was to test out comedy routines and refine a script that would eventually be shot for the silver screen. The result was the movie classic, “A Day at the Races.”

This on-the-road method of producing a first-rate, tried-and-true screenplay was one that the Marx Brothers had employed the previous year, ultimately culminating with the hit comedy, “A Night at the Opera.” But, unlike the 1935 road show, the 1936 version traveled nearly twice as far (some 6,000 miles) and met with greater fanfare.

So it was that on August 2, 1936, Groucho, Chico, Harpo and their entourage of entertainers found themselves in Cleveland, Ohio, playing the Palace Theater at Playhouse Square and perfecting various gags for their next movie triumph.

That same day, the second-place Cleveland Indians played host to the league-leading New York Yankees in a much-anticipated Sunday ballgame. In an effort to boost attendance as well as promote the Great Lakes Exposition (something of a mini-World’s Fair held along the shore of Lake Erie), the Indians decided to stage their contest at a ballpark much larger than the very cozy League Park. The game took place at Cleveland’s cavernous Municipal Stadium, the venue’s only big league contest of the season and the first time the Indians had played there since 1933. It was quite a show.

With ticket-holders also gaining complimentary admission to the nearby fair, well over 65,000 fans paid to enter the stadium. They certainly got their money’s worth. The clubs staged an epic duel, the game running 16 innings before being called due to darkness with the score knotted at four runs apiece. Among the ballplayers taking part in the battle were future Hall of Famers Joe DiMaggio, Lou Gehrig, Bill Dickey and Tony Lazzeri for the Yanks, and Earl Averill for the Indians.

But the wildest action took place just before the ballgame, as described in the Sporting News of August 6, 1936:

While the Tribe was holding batting practice the Three Marx Brothers of screen and stage fame, came roaring into the big bowl with a police escort and a bevy of beauties. The trio climaxed an impromptu act by downing Second Baseman Roy Hughes of the Indians and tearing off his shirt as the great crowd roared and Roy blushed.

While Lou Gehrig collected three hits at the plate that day, the Iron Horse may have gotten an even bigger kick posing with the three comedic geniuses who were the Marx Brothers.

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum features a collection of nearly 250,000 photographs like this one. Reproductions are available for purchase. To purchase a reprint of this photograph or others from the Photo Archive collections, please call (607) 547-0375. Hall of Fame members receive a 10-percent discount.