Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

Known as The Human Vacuum Cleaner, Brooks Robinson established a standard of excellence for modern-day third basemen. He played 23 seasons for the Orioles, setting Major League career records for games, putouts, assists, chances, double plays and fielding percentage. A clutch hitter, Robinson totaled 268 career home runs, at one time an American League record for third basemen. Robinson earned the league’s MVP Award in 1964 and the World Series MVP in 1970, when he hit .429 and made a collection of defensive gems. Watch more Baseball Hall of Fame videos: http://ift.tt/18bou9N Visit the official Baseball Hall of Fame website: http://ift.tt/TRV4Z2 Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Twitter: http://ift.tt/18bou9S Like the Baseball Hall of Fame on Facebook: http://ift.tt/15XLM9l Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Google+: http://ift.tt/18bou9U The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is home to the greatest stars and the history of the game. Located in scenic Cooperstown, New York, the Hall of Fame is dedicated to preserving the sport’s history, honoring excellence within the game, and connecting generations through baseball.

Vincent Edward “Vin” Scully (born November 29, 1927) is an American sportscaster, best known as the play-by-play announcer for the Los Angeles Dodgers baseball team. He has been with the team since its days in Brooklyn. His 65 seasons with the Dodgers (1950–present) is the longest tenure of any broadcaster with a single team in professional sports history, and he is second by one year to only Tommy Lasorda in terms of number of years with the Dodgers organization in any capacity. Scully currently calls most Dodger home games (and selected road games) on SportsNet LA television and KLAC radio. He is known for his dulcet voice, lyrically descriptive style, and signature introduction to Dodger games: “It’s time for Dodger baseball! Hi, everybody, and a very pleasant good (day/evening) to you, wherever you may be.” Watch more Baseball Hall of Fame videos: http://ift.tt/18bou9N Visit the official Baseball Hall of Fame website: http://ift.tt/TRV4Z2 Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Twitter: http://ift.tt/18bou9S Like the Baseball Hall of Fame on Facebook: http://ift.tt/15XLM9l Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Google+: http://ift.tt/18bou9U The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is home to the greatest stars and the history of the game. Located in scenic Cooperstown, New York, the Hall of Fame is dedicated to preserving the sport’s history, honoring excellence within the game, and connecting generations through baseball.

As The Captain wraps up a 20 year career in pinstripes, the Hall of Fame looks back at Derek Jeter’s career through the many artifacts that Jeter has donated to the museum’s collection since his rookie season in 1996. Watch more Baseball Hall of Fame videos: http://ift.tt/18bou9N Visit the official Baseball Hall of Fame website: http://ift.tt/TRV4Z2 Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Twitter: http://ift.tt/18bou9S Like the Baseball Hall of Fame on Facebook: http://ift.tt/15XLM9l Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Google+: http://ift.tt/18bou9U The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is home to the greatest stars and the history of the game. Located in scenic Cooperstown, New York, the Hall of Fame is dedicated to preserving the sport’s history, honoring excellence within the game, and connecting generations through baseball.

After succeeding the larger-than-life Kenesaw Mountain Landis as commissioner in 1945, Albert Happy Chandler guided baseball through six turbulent years. A former U.S. senator and governor of Kentucky, the honest Chandler maintained the commissioner’s office as a position of authority. He took swift action against players who left to play in the Mexican League and presided over the game when Brooklyn Dodgers’ president Branch Rickey signed Jackie Robinson in 1945 and integrated Major League baseball in 1947. Watch more Baseball Hall of Fame videos: http://ift.tt/18bou9N Visit the official Baseball Hall of Fame website: http://ift.tt/TRV4Z2 Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Twitter: http://ift.tt/18bou9S Like the Baseball Hall of Fame on Facebook: http://ift.tt/15XLM9l Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Google+: http://ift.tt/18bou9U The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is home to the greatest stars and the history of the game. Located in scenic Cooperstown, New York, the Hall of Fame is dedicated to preserving the sport’s history, honoring excellence within the game, and connecting generations through baseball.

Exhibiting an understated style that became his trademark, Hank Aaron became the all-time home-run champion via one of the most consistent offensive careers in baseball history, with 3,771 hits. In addition to his 755 home runs, he also set Major League records for total bases, extra-base hits and RBIs. Aaron was the 1957 National League MVP, won three Gold Gloves for his play in right field and was named to a record 25 All-Star squads. Watch more Baseball Hall of Fame videos: http://ift.tt/18bou9N Visit the official Baseball Hall of Fame website: http://ift.tt/TRV4Z2 Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Twitter: http://ift.tt/18bou9S Like the Baseball Hall of Fame on Facebook: http://ift.tt/15XLM9l Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Google+: http://ift.tt/18bou9U The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is home to the greatest stars and the history of the game. Located in scenic Cooperstown, New York, the Hall of Fame is dedicated to preserving the sport’s history, honoring excellence within the game, and connecting generations through baseball.

Thirty-eight years ago today, Minnie Minoso returned to the big leagues as a 50-year-old DH for the #WhiteSox. This photo of Minoso in his days as an All-Star was taken by Osvaldo Salas.

Thirty-eight years ago today, Minnie Minoso returned to the big leagues as a 50-year-old DH for the #WhiteSox. This photo of Minoso in his days as an All-Star was taken by Osvaldo Salas.

Exhibiting an understated style that became his trademark, Hank Aaron became the all-time home-run champion via one of the most consistent offensive careers in baseball history, with 3,771 hits. In addition to his 755 home runs, he also set Major League records for total bases, extra-base hits and RBIs. Aaron was the 1957 National League MVP, won three Gold Gloves for his play in right field and was named to a record 25 All-Star squads. Watch more Baseball Hall of Fame videos: http://ift.tt/18bou9N Visit the official Baseball Hall of Fame website: http://ift.tt/TRV4Z2 Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Twitter: http://ift.tt/18bou9S Like the Baseball Hall of Fame on Facebook: http://ift.tt/15XLM9l Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Google+: http://ift.tt/18bou9U The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is home to the greatest stars and the history of the game. Located in scenic Cooperstown, New York, the Hall of Fame is dedicated to preserving the sport’s history, honoring excellence within the game, and connecting generations through baseball.

Allie and Casey

New York Yankees pitcher Allie Reynolds admitted he couldn’t help knowing he was on the verge of pitching his second no-hitter of the 1951 season, adding, “It was always up there on the scoreboard. However, I wasn’t too concerned. After nine years, you’re more concerned with winning and staying in the league.”

With the end of the regular season only days away, Reynolds took the mound at Yankee Stadium in the first game of a doubleheader against the rival Boston Red Sox on September 28. When the day’s action was over, not only had the rugged righty made history, but his team – the two-time defending World Series champs – would clinch their third consecutive American League pennant and 18th in franchise history.

With an announced crowd of 39,038 on hand for the Friday afternoon twinbill, the veteran Reynolds, using a hard fastball and sharp slider, would hold the BoSox hitless on his 119 pitches, winning 8-0, while striking out nine and walking four. The New York offense combined for 10 hits, which included home runs by Gene Woodling and Joe Collins. Reynolds’ last appearance before the World Series would raise his won-loss record to 17-8, while the shutout was his league-leading seventh of the season.

New York’s legendary center fielder, Joe DiMaggio, realized a no-hitter was a possibility in the sixth inning.

“I knew he was shooting for it and Reynolds knew it too,” DiMaggio said. “I could tell from the way he was pitching that he was doing the same things he did in the no-hitter against Cleveland. His fastball was zipping and his slider was good. Every pitch he threw had something on it – and his control, terrific.”

Having previously tossed a hitless game against the Cleveland Indians on July 12, the 34-year-old Reynolds, a Creek Indian from Oklahoma, became the first AL pitcher with two no-hitters in one season. The only other big leaguer to toss two no-hitters in one season up to that point was Johnny Vander Meer of the National League’s Cincinnati Reds, who held the Boston Braves and Brooklyn Dodgers hitless in succession in 1938.

“The game was easier and, yet, not easier than the July 12 affair,” Reynolds said. “In Cleveland, I not only had to pitch the no-hitter, once I got into the seventh and saw the feat within reach, but I had to win the game. Gene Woodling did that for me with a homer and I beat [Bob] Feller, 1-0.

“In the Stadium, the boys gave me plenty of support with their bats.”

According to reports, the day after Reynolds’ second no-hitter, and after the end of another doubleheader with the Red Sox, a crew of workmen came out to the pitching mound dug up the pitching rubber – two feet long and 45 pounds – and carted it off to the New York clubhouse, where they gave it a good scrubbing and polishing. After being signed by all the Yankee and Red Sox players, the mound slab was presented to Reynolds prior to the regular season finale on Sept. 30.

This image, taken by acclaimed photographer Osvaldo Salas, who documented the game’s biggest stars of the 1950s with his camera, shows Yankees manager Casey Stengel (left) and Reynolds holding the commemorative pitching rubber in front of New York’s dugout. Today, the autographed artifact can be seen on the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum’s third floor in the exhibit Sacred Ground, which examines ballparks of the past and present.

An exhibition on the photographer’s work, entitled Osvaldo Salas’ American Baseball Photographs, opened on the Museum’s third floor in May of this year and will be on display through May 2015. Thanks to a generous donation by Hall of Fame supporter Rick Swig, almost 900 of Salas’ negatives are now a part of the permanent photographic collection at the Museum.

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum features a collection of nearly 250,000 photographs like this one. Reproductions are available for purchase. To purchase a reprint of this photograph or others from the Photo Archive collections, please call (607) 547-0375. Hall of Fame members receive a 10-percent discount.

Al Kaline was a model of consistency who excelled with minimum fanfare. Over 22 seasons, the quiet, durable Tigers outfielder accumulated 3,007 hits, 399 home runs, a .297 batting average, 10 Gold Gloves and 18 All-Star team selections. Mr. Tiger won the batting title in 1955, hitting .340 at the age of 20. His reputation as a clutch performer was enhanced by his .379 average against St. Louis in the 1968 World Series. Watch more Baseball Hall of Fame videos: http://ift.tt/18bou9N Visit the official Baseball Hall of Fame website: http://ift.tt/TRV4Z2 Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Twitter: http://ift.tt/18bou9S Like the Baseball Hall of Fame on Facebook: http://ift.tt/15XLM9l Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Google+: http://ift.tt/18bou9U The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is home to the greatest stars and the history of the game. Located in scenic Cooperstown, New York, the Hall of Fame is dedicated to preserving the sport’s history, honoring excellence within the game, and connecting generations through baseball.

From our Diamond Mines exhibit, this is an interview with baseball scouts, Jimmy Gonzales and Mark Baca. Watch more Baseball Hall of Fame videos: http://ift.tt/18bou9N Visit the official Baseball Hall of Fame website: http://ift.tt/TRV4Z2 Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Twitter: http://ift.tt/18bou9S Like the Baseball Hall of Fame on Facebook: http://ift.tt/15XLM9l Follow the Baseball Hall of Fame on Google+: http://ift.tt/18bou9U The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is home to the greatest stars and the history of the game. Located in scenic Cooperstown, New York, the Hall of Fame is dedicated to preserving the sport’s history, honoring excellence within the game, and connecting generations through baseball.